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19juil/13

viosbr tool

Une petite commande utile pour restaurer un mapping en mauvais état sur un VIOS à partir des sauvegardes automatiques lancées par la cron de root.

0 0 * * * (/usr/ios/cli/ioscli viosbr -backup -file vios_config_bkup -frequency daily -numfiles  10 )
$ viosbr -backup -file /home/padmin/cfgbackups/my_vios_config_bkup
Backup of this node (vios_1) successful

$ viosbr -view -list
my_vios_config_bkup.tar.gz
vios_config_bkup.01.tar.gz
vios_config_bkup.02.tar.gz
vios_config_bkup.03.tar.gz
vios_config_bkup.04.tar.gz
vios_config_bkup.05.tar.gz
vios_config_bkup.06.tar.gz
vios_config_bkup.07.tar.gz
vios_config_bkup.08.tar.gz
vios_config_bkup.09.tar.gz
vios_config_bkup.10.tar.gz

$ ls -ltr /home/padmin/cfgbackups
total 280
-rw-r--r--    1 root     system         8384 May 22 00:00 vios_config_bkup.07.tar.gz
-rw-r--r--    1 root     system         8384 May 22 00:00 vios_config_bkup.06.tar.gz
-rw-r--r--    1 root     system         8384 May 22 00:00 vios_config_bkup.05.tar.gz
-rw-r--r--    1 root     system         8384 May 22 00:00 vios_config_bkup.04.tar.gz
-rw-r--r--    1 root     system         8384 May 22 00:00 vios_config_bkup.03.tar.gz
-rw-r--r--    1 root     system         8383 May 22 00:00 vios_config_bkup.02.tar.gz
-rw-r--r--    1 root     system         8384 May 22 00:00 vios_config_bkup.01.tar.gz
-rw-r--r--    1 root     system         8475 Jul 17 00:00 vios_config_bkup.08.tar.gz
-rw-r--r--    1 root     system         8474 Jul 18 00:00 vios_config_bkup.09.tar.gz
-rw-r--r--    1 root     system         8166 Jul 19 00:00 vios_config_bkup.10.tar.gz
-rw-r--r--    1 root     staff          8170 Jul 19 14:27 my_vios_config_bkup.tar.gz

Pour restaurer la sauvegarde automatique vios_config_bkup.10.tar.gz

$ viosbr -restore –file /home/padmin/cfgbackups/vios_config_bkup.10.tar.gz

Source: man viosbr

24jan/13

How to debug environnement problem with padmin user on Virtual I/O Server

What is interesting is the HMC command syntax with viosvrcmd and oem_setup_env, example:

unable run oem_setup_env

$ oem_setup_env
rksh: oem_setup_env:  not found

debug via HMC

hscroot@hmcV7:~ > viosvrcmd -m 9119-FHB -p VIOS1 -c "oem_setup_env
> ls -ld /home/padmin"
drwxr-x---    9 root     system         4096 Jan 24 11:13 /home/padmin

hscroot@hmcV7:~ > viosvrcmd -m 9119-FHB -p VIOS1 -c "oem_setup_env
> chown padmin:staff /home/padmin"

login again with padmin

$ oem_setup_env
#

NOTE: hit return after the "oem_setup_env without ending the quotes. That will put you to the next line to run your command as root on the vios then end your quote.

Else you can also define a variable CMD like this :

hscroot@hmcV7:~ > CMD=`printf "oem_setup_env\nchown padmin:staff /home/padmin"`
hscroot@hmcV7:~ > viosvrcmd -m 9119-FHB -p VIOS1 -c "$CMD"

Thank's Jonathan and Brian :)

20nov/12

Replace the physical adapter of the SEA

How can I replace the physical adapter of my SEA ?

Virtual I/O Server Version:​ 1.5.2.x-FP11.x, 2.1.0.x-FP20.x, 2.1.1.x-FP21.x, 2.1.2.x-FP22.x

Customer needs to replace the physical ethernet adapter of the SEA that is a NIC (Network Interface Card) with the same or different feature code from the original NIC but the same device driver.

NIC is in slot 5. Customer wants to replace the NIC with a different F/C but they use the same driver.
NOTE: This may not work if the replacement NIC uses a different device driver. You may need to remove the SEA and recreate it with the new NIC and new device driver.

1. Determine which ethernet device is the SEA:

$ lsdev -type adapter
ent8 Available Shared Ethernet Adapter

2. Make sure the SEA is in BACKUP state:

$ oem_setup_env
# entstat -d ent8 |grep State ---> must be in BACKUP

If State is PRIMARY, you must force failover to BACKUP state:

# chdev -l ent8 -a ha_mode=standby

3. Determine which is the real or physical adapter of the SEA:

# entstat -d ent8 |grep Real
Real Side Statistics:
Real Adapter: ent0

4. Determine the physical location code of the NIC:

# lscfg -vl ent0
ent0 U787B.001.DNW3CA2-P1-C1-T1 10/100/1000 Mbps Ethernet PCI-X Adapter II (1410ff01) b. C1 = slot 1

5. Determine which interface has IP address configured:

# netstat -in
Customer has IP address on SEA interface en8.
If no IP addresses are assigned to the SEA interface en8, skip steps 7 and 8.

6. Determine if SEA interface is using the default gateway:

# netstat -rn.

7. If IP address is assigned to the SEA interface, bring the interface down:

# ifconfig en8 down detach

8. Temporarily put the interface in a defined state:

# rmdev -l en8

9. Temporarily put the SEA device in a defined state:

# rmdev -l ent8 ---> SEA defined

10. Remove the real or physical ethernet device of the SEA;

# rmdev -dl ent0 ---> real adapter for ent8

11. Use hot plug manager to replace the adapter.

12. Run configuration manager:

# cfgmgr

13. Check that the new real or physical adapter is available:

# lsdev -Cc adapter

14. Make the SEA available:

# mkdev -l ent8

15. Check that SEA is available:

# lsdev -Cc adapter

16. Make the en interface available:

# mkdev -l en8 (or ifconfig en8 up)

17. Check that default gateway is assigned to the previously assigned interface (step 5):

# netstat -rn

If no default gateway:

# mkdev -l inet0

18. Check that en8 (or interface in step 5) can ping default gateway:

# ping <IP of default gateway>

19. Failover back to PRIMARY:

# chdev -l ent8 -a ha_mode=auto

SOURCE: Technote T1011065

16nov/12

VIOS SEA Failover flapping on backup SEA

Why is the backup SEA adapter of my SEA failover flapping from Primary to Backup repeatedly?

Software version: Virtual I/O Server
2.1.0.x-FP20.x, 2.1.1.x-FP21.x, 2.1.2.x-FP22.x, 2.1.2.12, 2.1.2.13, 2.1.3.10, 2.2.0, 2.2.0.10, 2.2.0.11, 2.2.0.12, 2.2.0.13, 2.2.1.0, 2.2.1.1, 2.2.1.3

The Shared Ethernet Adapter (SEA) failover hung or became unresponsive. The backup SEA adapter was flapping between Primary and Backup states which is seen as contention on the control channel between primary ( 1) and backup (2) of SEAs.

This issue can be caused by 2 different problems:

1) The backup SEA sends a pulse to the primary SEA to see if it is still alive. The primary VIO is not able to send heart beats to backup SEA fast enough due to a lack of available CPU cycles. The backup SEA with trunk priority 2 tries to become primary before it receives the reply and logs these SEAHA_PRIMARY, SEAHA_BACKUP errors. This can sometimes be resolved by changing the VIO CPUs from shared to dedicated.

Another resolution is to update the VIO servers to at least 2.2.0.12 FP24 SP02 to get the SEA fixes for this issue.

2) CPU folding enabled on VIO servers can cause SEA flapping and in turn will cause the VIO SEA to hang.

Processor folding: Processor folding currently is not supported for VIOS partitions. If processor folding is enabled on your VIOS, and migration media is used to move from VIOS 1.5 to 2.1.0.13 FP 23, or later, processor folding remains enabled. Upgrading via migration media does not change the processor folding state. If you have installed VIOS 2.1.3.0, or later, and have not changed the folding policy, then folding is disabled.

Check for CPU folding on VIOS:

$ oem_setup_env
# schedo -o vpm_fold_policy

If the value is anything other than 4, turn it off with this command:

# schedo -p -o vpm_fold_policy=4

The current value can also found in the ./kernel/kernel.snap file in the VIO snap.

Link: A explanation of AIX Virtual processor folding

AIX Virtual Processor Folding is Misunderstood

++

31août/12

How to Capture Boot Debug of an AIX vSCSI Client in IVM

Problem(Abstract)

How to capture boot debug of a PowerVM AIX client partition that is failing to boot from vSCSI disk in an Integrated Virtualization Manager (IVM) environment.

Symptom

AIX (VIO) client is accessible via maintenance mode, but fails to do a normal boot.

Environment

REQUIREMENTS

A program where console terminal logging can be enabled will be needed. The following procedure uses PuTTY (a Windows ssh client program) as the means to open a console session to capture the boot debug data to a file. It is available for download at http://www.putty.org

Resolving the problem

PROCEDURE

  • Open telnet session to the Virtual I/O Server (VIOS) via putty and enable session logging as follows:

Under Category

Session
-> click on Logging
-> select "All session output" on the right
-> specify the filename in the "Log file name" box as shown in Figure 1

Terminal
-> click on Keyboard
-> Select Control-H for the Backspace key

Click on Session
-> type in the full domain to the VIOS in the Host Name and Saved Sessions box
-> click on Open

  • Login to VIOS as padmin user and open a console session to the client partition ID in question by running
    $ mkvt -id <client LPAR ID>To display the lpar_id for each partition configured on the IVM server, including the VIOS, ran
    $ lssyscfg -r lpar
  • Boot client lpar to Open Firmware prompt by hitting 8 after the IBM banner is displayed
    IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM
    IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM
    IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM
    IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM
    IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM
    IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM
    IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM
    IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM
    IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM
    IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM IBM

    1 = SMS Menu 5 = Default Boot List
    8 = Open Firmware Prompt 6 = Stored Boot List

    Memory Keyboard Network SCSI Speaker ok
    0 >

4. To start the boot debug, type the following at the Open Firmware prompt:

    0 > boot -s verbose -s debug(you will see a / cursor spin at the end of the line as the server begins to boot and verbose output begins to scroll up)
27juil/12

Virtual I/O Server migration with NIM

Download VIOS DVD migration 2.1.3.10 via IBM FIX CENTRAL
or download ISO image

SERVEUR NIM : AIX 7100-01-04-1216

monter l'image ISO du DVD de migration VIOS 2.1.3.10

# loopmount -i /export/images/VIOS_2.1.3.10.iso -o "-V cdrfs -o ro" -m /mnt

Copier le contenu du répertoire installp du DVD de migration dans le filesystem lpp_source

# cp -pr /mnt/installp /export/lpp_source/lppsrc_vios_21310

Définition du lpp_source lpp_src_vios_21310

nim -o define -t lpp_source -a server=master -a location=/export/lpp_source/lpp_src_vios_21310 lpp_src_vios_21310

Définition du spot spot_vios_21310 à partir du lpp_source lpp_src_vios_21310

nim -o define -t spot -a server=master -a location=/export/spot -a source=lpp_src_vios_21310 -a installp_flags=-aQg spot_vios_21310

VIRTUAL I/O SERVER : IOSLEVEL 1.5.2.6-FP-11.1 SP-02

1. Paramétrer l'interface Ethernet pour l'installation NIM via le menu SMS.

***********************************************************************************

          Welcome to Base Operating System
                      Installation and Maintenance

Type the number of your choice and press Enter. Choice is indicated by >>>.

>>> 1 Start Install Now with Default Settings

    2 Change/Show Installation Settings and Install

    3 Start Maintenance Mode for System Recovery

    4 Configure Network Disks (iSCSI)

    5 Select Storage Adapters


    88  Help ?
    99  Previous Menu

>>> Choice [1]:1
***********************************************************************************
                          VIOS Migration Installation Summary

Disks:  hdisk1...

>>> 1   Continue with Install
                       +-----------------------------------------------------
    88  Help ?         |  WARNING: Base Operating System Installation will
    99  Previous Menu  |destroy or impair recovery of SOME data on the
                       |destination disk hdisk1.
>>> Choice [1]:1
***********************************************************************************
Migration menu preparation in progress.

        Please wait...


        Approximate     Elapsed time
     % tasks complete   (in minutes)


          0               0
***********************************************************************************
       Migration Confirmation

  Either type 0 and press Enter to continue the installation, or type the
  number of your choice and press Enter.

    1  List the saved Base System configuration files which will not be
       merged into the system.  These files are saved in /tmp/bos.
    2  List the filesets which will be removed and not replaced.
    3  List directories which will have all current contents removed.
    4  Reboot without migrating.

    Acceptance of license agreements is required before using system.
    You will be prompted to accept after the system reboots.

>>> 0  Continue with the migration.
   88  Help ?

+---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  WARNING: Selected files, directories, and filesets (installable options)
    from the Base System will be removed.  Choose 2 or 3 for more information.


>>> Choice[0]:0
***********************************************************************************

MIGRATION en cours .......

$ ioslevel
2.1.3.10-FP23
11avr/12

Extract mksysb from tape

Question
How to extract mksysb from tape to file for NIM Usage

Cause
There may be occasions where a machine's backup resides on tape but the mksysb needs to be transferred to a NIM server for remote installations. This document describes how to properly extract a mksysb image backed up onto tape and restore it to a file.

Answer
Extract Mksysb from tape to NIM resource

Introduction
Extract the /tapeblksz file from the tape
Using the 'lsmksysb' command to verify mksysb tape readability
Extract the mksysb image from the tape
Verify that the system recognizes extracted file as a mksysb image
Using the new mksysb file as a NIM resource

*For future reference, all further mentions using the word “media” will refer to Base AIX Installation DVDs, unless otherwise specified.
Furthermore, all references for any device (cdrom, ethernet, tape, etc) will always be cd0, ent0, rmt0, hdisk0, etc, unless otherwise noted. You may, depending on your environment, need to use other devices. Substitute as needed.

This document will describe how to extract a mksysb image that currently exists on tape and store it to disk. Additionally, this document provides an application for the extracted mksysb used for a NIM environment.

This resource was written with the presumption that a mksysb has already been written to tape.

(!) NOTE: Before beginning this procedure, please read through the following reference for a better understanding of the mksysb structure and layout on tape:

Reference 1: Creating a mksysb backup to tape

http://www.ibm.com/support/docview.wss?uid=isg3T1010809

This is an important step because different tape devices can be set to write the media at different block sizes. If the tape device is set to a different block size than the tape, it may not read the tape properly, or at all.

The tape device block size first has to be configured to read 512 byte blocks to find out what information the ./tapeblksz file has. This file holds the information concerning the block size setting when the tape was written. The block size had to be changed to 512 because the ./tapeblksz file is written to the second image of the mksysb in 512 byte blocks.

Change the block size of the tape to 512 byte blocks

# chdev -l rmt0 -a block_size=512
rmt0 changed

Rewind the tape after the block size change.

# tctl -f /dev/rmt0 rewind

Run the ‘restore’ command which will point to the second image of the mksysb backup and extract the tapeblksz file to your current working directory:

# restore -s2 -xqvf /dev/rmt0.1 ./tapeblksz
New volume on /dev/rmt0.1:
Cluster 51200 bytes (100 blocks).
Volume number 1
Date of backup: Thu May 7 15:44:07 2009
Files backed up by name
User root
x 10 ./tapeblksz
total size: 10
files restored: 1

Running a ‘cat’ against ./tapeblksz provides the block size at which the tape was created.

# cat tapeblksz
1024 NONE

Once the block size is obtained, change the tape block size to the size specified by the ./tapeblksz file. In this case it will need to be changed to 1024.

# chdev -l rmt0 -a block_size=1024
rmt0 changed

Be sure to rewind the tape after changing the block size.

# tctl -f /dev/rmt0 rewind

On the target system where the mksysb file will be extracted, be sure to find a location that has plenty of space to hold the mksysb file.

Mksysb files can be fairly large, so when moving them from one medium to a filesystem it is important to consider a few things.

First, check the ulimit for root to make sure the 'fsize' = >2Gb
# ulimit –a
-or-
# vi /etc/security/limits

Secondly, confirm that the filesystem being written to is large file enabled JFS or a JFS2 filesystem. The following output includes the ‘lsfs’ and ‘df’ commands to verify the filesystem format and space information.

# lsfs
Name Nodename MountPt VFS Size Options Auto Accounting
/dev/hd4 -- / jfs2 786432 -- yes no
/dev/hd1 -- /home jfs2 4456448 -- yes no
/dev/hd2 -- /usr jfs2 2883584 -- yes no
/dev/hd9var -- /var jfs2 262144 -- yes no
/dev/hd3 -- /tmp jfs2 262144 -- yes no
/proc -- /proc procfs -- -- yes no
/dev/hd10opt -- /opt jfs2 262144 -- yes no
/dev/fslv00 -- /lppbackup jfs2 100663296 rw yes no
/dev/fslv02 -- /mksysb jfs2 20971520 rw yes no

# df -g
Filesystem GB blocks Free %Used Iused %Iused Mounted on
/dev/hd4 0.38 0.35 7% 2189 3% /
/dev/hd2 1.38 0.11 92% 34296 54% /usr
/dev/hd9var 0.12 0.11 11% 443 2% /var
/dev/hd3 0.12 0.12 2% 41 1% /tmp
/dev/hd1 2.12 2.06 4% 38 1% /home
/proc - - - - - /proc
/dev/hd10opt 0.12 0.05 63% 1538 13% /opt
/dev/fslv00 48.00 19.17 61% 511 1% /lppbackup
/dev/fslv02 10.00 8.20 18% 4 1% /mksysb

The 'lsmksysb' command is a useful command to obtain information regarding the mksysb and verifies that the system acknowledges the mksysb image on the tape.

(!) NOTE: 'lsmksysb' is not a command that verifies whether a tape will be bootable or restore without issues. Reference the 'lsmksysb' man page or infocenter for more information on 'lsmksysb':

Reference 2: InfoCenter: lsmksyb command

http://pic.dhe.ibm.com/infocenter/aix/v6r1/index.jsp?topic=%2Fcom.ibm.aix.cmds%2Fdoc%2Faixcmds3%2Flsmksysb.htm

Running the command, '# lsmksysb -lf /dev/rmt0', will list out information about the mksysb including: the date the mksysb was taken, the oslevel, the size of the mksysb, the lv structure, etc.

# lsmksysb -lf /dev/rmt0

VOLUME GROUP: rootvg
BACKUP DATE/TIME: Thu May 7 15:42:48 CDT 2009
UNAME INFO: AIX shaevelbso 3 5 00059D5C4C00
BACKUP OSLEVEL: 5.3.7.0
MAINTENANCE LEVEL: 5300-07
BACKUP SIZE (MB): 7168
SHRINK SIZE (MB): 4358
VG DATA ONLY: no

rootvg:
LV NAME TYPE LPs PPs PVs LV STATE MOUNT POINT
hd5 boot 1 1 1 closed/syncd N/A
hd6 paging 4 4 1 open/syncd N/A
hd8 jfs2log 1 1 1 open/syncd N/A
hd4 jfs2 3 3 1 open/syncd /
hd2 jfs2 11 11 1 open/syncd /usr
hd9var jfs2 1 1 1 open/syncd /var
hd3 jfs2 1 1 1 open/syncd /tmp
hd1 jfs2 17 17 1 open/syncd /home
hd10opt jfs2 1 1 1 open/syncd /opt
lg_dumplv sysdump 16 16 1 open/syncd N/A

At this point we know that the mksysb on the tape actually resides as the fourth image of the mksysb backup. Therefore, a command needs to be used to extract the fourth image from the mksysb tape and store it to a file on the system. The 'dd' command can be used to perform this operation.

To extract the mksysb from the tape, run the following, using the block size obtained from the ./tapeblksz file for the bs= value in the dd command.:

# dd if=/dev/rmt0.1 of=/mksysb/test.shaevel bs=1024 fskip=3
1462150+0 records in
1462150+0 records out

After the mksysb file has been extracted, ensure that the system still acknowledges the file as a mksysb:

If not in the directory already, make sure to change directory to where the mksysb file resides:

# cd /mksysb

Run the 'lsmksysb' command to list out the information about the backup.

# lsmksysb -lf test.shaevel

VOLUME GROUP: rootvg
BACKUP DATE/TIME: Thu May 7 15:42:48 CDT 2009
UNAME INFO: AIX shaevelbso 3 5 00059D5C4C00
BACKUP OSLEVEL: 5.3.7.0
MAINTENANCE LEVEL: 5300-07
BACKUP SIZE (MB): 7168
SHRINK SIZE (MB): 4358
VG DATA ONLY: no

rootvg:
LV NAME TYPE LPs PPs PVs LV STATE MOUNT POINT
hd5 boot 1 1 1 closed/syncd N/A
hd6 paging 4 4 1 open/syncd N/A
hd8 jfs2log 1 1 1 open/syncd N/A
hd4 jfs2 3 3 1 open/syncd /
hd2 jfs2 11 11 1 open/syncd /usr
hd9var jfs2 1 1 1 open/syncd /var
hd3 jfs2 1 1 1 open/syncd /tmp
hd1 jfs2 17 17 1 open/syncd /home
hd10opt jfs2 1 1 1 open/syncd /opt
lg_dumplv sysdump 16 16 1 open/syncd N/A

The 'lsmksysb' output confirms that this file is a mksysb.

7fév/12

IBM VIOS vs AIX MATRIX

Voici une matrice des niveaux de Virtual I/O Server et leurs correspondances sous AIX.

Ce document IBM est tiré de cette très intéressante technote :
NIM installation and backup of the VIO server

20jan/12

Tips for implementing NPIV on IBM Power Systems

IBM India Lab write a excelent document on configuring NPIV :

Power Systems SAN Multipath Configuration Using NPIV v1.2

Chris Gibson shares some tips for implementing NPIV in an AIX and Virtual I/O Server environment on IBM POWER7 systems.

Tips for implementing NPIV on IBM Power Systems

au-NPIV-pdf

Thank's Chris.

Other NPIV source :
NPIV and the virtual I/O server 2008

IBM PowerVM Virtualization managing and monitoring

IBM PowerVM Virtualization Introduction and Configuration

Taggé comme: Aucun commentaire
20jan/12

Add Additional Vlan tags to running IVM

Abstract

Add Vlan tags to a running IVM with running AIX Lpars
Content

ADD ADDITION VLAN TAG TO AN EXISTNG SEA ON IVM
What if questions are listed at the bottom of this document.

Configuring VIOS (IVM)

Add and additional Vlan tag of 148 to IVM so AIX Lpar could use
Vlan 148 tag to communicate.

Currently vios(IVM) has vitual adapter ent2 with PVID of ‘1’ as part of
SEA ( Shared Ethernet Adapter)

Steps to add vlan tag

+  Log in to IVM as padmin

Find the managed sytem name for commands that would follow the '-m' flag

$ lssyscfg -r sys -F name

9117-mma
Managed system name is 9117-mma

+ Get the Lpar name and ID

$ lssyscfg -r lpar -F name,lpar_id
VIOS6,1
mule-us,2
mule-temp,3

+ In oem_setu_env shell
look for the next avalilable slot :

# lsslot -c slot

Here is an example of the output
U7311.D11.10B8BDA-P1-C4 Logical I/O Slot pci4 pci5 ent2 ent3 ent4 ent5
U7879.001.DQD1AM1-P1-C1 Logical I/O Slot pci1 ent0
U9117.570.102C1EA-V5-C0 Virtual I/O Slot vsa0
U9117.570.102C1EA-V5-C3 Virtual I/O Slot ent6
U9117.570.102C1EA-V5-C4 Virtual I/O Slot ent7
U9117.570.102C1EA-V5-C13 Virtual I/O Slot vscsi0

The last slot used is C13
Slot 14 is the next available.

+ As padmin add a new virtual adapter which will have vlan tag of 148.
We must use a PVID that is not used anywhere else and it will not ever be
Used. In this case we used PVID of 400.

$ chhwres -m 9117-mma -p VIOS6 -o a -r virtualio --rsubtype eth -s 14 -a "ieee_virtual_eth=1,port_vlan_id=400,addl_vlan_ids=148,is_trunk=1,trunk_
priority=1"

-o is the option ‘a’ is to Add, -s is the slot number
We set the ieee_virtual_eth to 1 which means allow additional Vlans.
‘additional vlan’ is to specify the Vlans being added.
is_tunk=1 means that Access External Network is set to yes. Priority is ‘1’
since the current SEA has trunk priority of ‘1’.

The command gave this output which means it created slot 14

/usr/ios/lpm/sbin/lpmdrmgr drmgr -c slot -s 'U7998.61X.10B59CA-V1-C14' -a

+ Verify that the slot was crreated :

$ lshwres -r virtualio --rsubtype eth --level lpar

Here is the sample output.

lpar_name=VIOS6,lpar_id=1,slot_num=3,state=1,ieee_virtual_eth=0,port_vla
n_id=1,addl_vlan_ids=none,is_trunk=1,trunk_priority=1,is_required=0,mac_
addr=CAF57130D303
lpar_name=VIOS6,lpar_id=1,slot_num=4,state=1,ieee_virtual_eth=0,port_vla
n_id=2,addl_vlan_ids=none,is_trunk=1,trunk_priority=1,is_required=0,mac_
addr=CAF57130D304
lpar_name=VIOS6,lpar_id=1,slot_num=5,state=1,ieee_virtual_eth=0,port_vla
n_id=3,addl_vlan_ids=none,is_trunk=1,trunk_priority=1,is_required=0,mac_
addr=CAF57130D305
lpar_name=VIOS6,lpar_id=1,slot_num=6,state=1,ieee_virtual_eth=0,port_vla
n_id=4,addl_vlan_ids=none,is_trunk=1,trunk_priority=1,is_required=0,mac_
addr=CAF57130D306

***-------------- this is the newly created Slot 14

lpar_name=VIOS6,lpar_id=1,slot_num=14,state=1,ieee_virtual_eth=1,port_vl
an_id=400,addl_vlan_ids=148,is_trunk=1,trunk_priority=1,is_required=0,ma
c_addr=CAF57130D30E
****------------------------

lpar_name=mule-us,lpar_id=2,slot_num=4,state=1,ieee_virtual_eth=0,port_v
lan_id=1,addl_vlan_ids=none,is_trunk=0,trunk_priority=0,is_required=0,ma
c_addr=CAF57DAB5C04
lpar_name=mule-temp,lpar_id=3,slot_num=4,state=0,ieee_virtual_eth=0,port
_vlan_id=1,addl_vlan_ids=none,is_trunk=0,trunk_priority=0,is_required=0,
mac_addr=CAF57FDA8C04

+ Find the newly created virtual adatper
$ oem_setup_env

# lsdev –Cc adapter
ent12 is available

+ Check if ent12 is in slot 14

# lscfg –vl ent12
You should see something like this
U9117.570.102C1EA-V5-C14-T1

+ Verify that vlan tag of 148 is present.

# entstat -d ent12 |grep -i vlan
Invalid VLAN ID Packets: 0
Port VLAN ID: 400
VLAN Tag IDs: 148 …. This will become part of SEA

+ Add the newly creatd virtual adapter,ent12, into SEA

The SEA already has virtual ent2,
NOTE: The coammand to add slot 14 ( which is ent12) must
include the ent2 as well, otherwise ent2 will
be removed from SEA configuration.
As padmin :

$ chdev -dev ent9 -attr virt_adapters=ent2,ent12

+ Verify that Vlan tag is part of SEA

$ oem_setup_env

# lsatrr -El ent9
last line of output: ent2 and ent12 (both virtual adapter) are listed

# entstat -d ent9 | grep -i vlan
you will see both 148 and 1 vlan tags

Section 2: Configuring Lpar

+ Assign vlan tag 148 to virtual adatper on AIX.

These are the screens, If you don’t have a virtual adapter, just click on ‘create adapter’ and simply create a virtual adapter.


+ Go to IVM GUI

This can be done while AIX is running.
When these screen-shot were captured, the Lpar was not running.
If the AIX partition is not runnig, the steps are the almost the same: Add the virtual
adapter and activate the partition to read-in the new Virtual adapter.
For this document, AIX would be in ‘running’ state.
Check the box next to the partition
Click on More Tasks
Properties

click on Ethernet tab

If you don’t have a virtual adapter, click on Create Adapter, and create one.

Select a virtual adapter, then from drop-down list
select vlan tag of 148. ( 148 will show up in the List)
Click OK

+ Go to AIX

run config manager

# cfgmgr

+ List Ethernet adapters
# lsdev -Cc adapter | grep ent

You will see the new virtual adapter on the aix which on our
example it is ent1

+ Verify Vlan tags
# entstat -d ent1 | grep -i vlan

You should see 148 now .

+ Put an IP on this virtual adapter , ent1

# smit chinet
select en1 NOT et1
enter IP and netmaks
set STATE to UP
Hit enter

+ Verify that en1 is up
# ifconfig -a

+ Try to PING and IP address from AIX

What if questions

- The new virtual adapter is incorrect. I have not added it to the SEA yet.
Resolution:
Delete the slot.
$ chhwres –p VIOS6 -o r -r virtualio --rsubtype eth -s 14
Slot # is 14

- I added the virtual adapter to SEA, need to take it out.
Resolution:

In our case, ent12 was added incorrectly need, to remove it.
Run the same chdev command to do the ‘add’, but this time leave out ent12

$ chdev -dev ent9 -attr virt_adapters=ent2

Now SEA only has one virtual adapter, which is the original ent2
To verify
# lsattr -El entX ( entX is the SEA ) in our case ent9

Source : IBM Technote

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